Apollo Image Archive Banner Image
Project Home About the Scans Browse Gallery Image Map Support Data Resources Ephemeris

For a complete listing of featured images: Featured Image List

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy announced an ambitious goal of sending an American safely to the Moon before the end of the decade. First, NASA learned to live and work in space with the Mercury and Gemini missions. Ultimately, NASA answered the challenge in 1969 with the successful landing of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM). To record their historic voyages and collect scientific observations many thousands of photographs were acquired with handheld and automated cameras during all the Apollo missions. After returning to Earth, the film was developed and stored at Johnson Space Center (JSC), where they still reside. Due to the historical significance of the original flight films, typically only duplicate (2nd or 3rd generation) film products are currently available for study and used to make prints.

To allow full access to the original flight films for both researchers and the general public, Johnson Space Center and Arizona State University's Space Exploration Resources are scanning and creating an online digital archive of all the original Apollo flight films. Through this online interface, users may browse through the archive and download any of the images. This web site also provides a suite of resources regarding the images and the cameras that were used during the Apollo program. Finally, be sure to check out other images of the Moon from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera and images from the Mercury and Gemini missions

submit to reddit

Current Project Status

Metric and Panoramic Frame scanning and processing has been completed! The full collection consists of 10,153 Metric frames and 4,697 Pan frames. There are also handheld images available from the Mercury, Gemini, and earlier Apollo missions in the Browse Gallery!

Johnson Space Center Space Exploration Resources Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Explroation Lunar and Planetary Institue LPI

Comments and suggestions can be mailed to apollo_webmaster@asu.edu